Not sure if my wheels are coated with Durabright, can I polish them?
Yes you can! There is a few ways to find out if your rims are coated, number one just by the look you can tell there's a plastic coating most of the time, number 2 Durebrights (Alcoa) or Accusheild (Accuride) have black stickers... non-Durabrights have blue stickers and the last way if your still not sure is grab some metal polish with a rag, rub a spot if it turns black there's no coating. To remove it I use these with a 3000 rpm polisher.
What sand paper grits do you use when sanding?
This step In my opinion is the secret, the most important of all the steps. The Depthness of the shine you will have will be in direct proportion to the sanding you do. So with that said… depending on how far, how much work and time you want to spend on sanding will determine how close to a perfect mirror your surface will become. Choosing the grits: 95% of my jobs are done with 320 followed by 400 and finishing with 600. Some jobs will require a bit more work and time, Older and much more pitted surfaces will need to be sanded with 120-180 grit first, I very rarely go lower then 180 on aluminum it will just create more unwanted work and loss of time to get all the marks done by the harsher grit. So 180, followed by 320, 400 and finished with 600 grit ready for the polishing step. I use a 5 inch sander but use 6 inch paper for a reason it's so when I do corners and stuff the paper folds up around the sander so I can get the edges easier with no scratching from the sander.
Do you wet sand or dry sand?
I Dry sand. There's no difference work wise aside from using water, dry imo is faster no need to keep spraying water and no need to clean up the water before you start polishing.
When I polish it leaves lines or buffer marks, brown zebra lines
There's basically 3 major reasons why you're leaving lines, first could be the products/pads you're using, Second experience and third the speed your buffing at. With that said you need to remember that on big surfaces, you'll never get 100% of the lines/marks out you'll drive yourself insane if you try. Also for some reason often on larger jobs the aluminum they use is made of different "blends" so one panel might be one grade and the other the mix will be a bit different and you'll get a difference end result VERY frustrating but it's all part of the Job. So make sure you're using a white untreated or flannel wheel with 480blf Blue from Menzerna for your finishing compound. 3000 rpm polishers will always leave more lines then using a 6000 rpm grinder. Here are some other reasons for getting lines when polishing, Could also be that you went too fast meaning, each stroke you moved your buffer up too much leaving sander marks behind. Also could be that your making too many side to side passed before putting more compound on, remember less product and more often gives a more even shine. So that's a few things to look at and see what you need to do differently.
Not sure if my wheels are coated with Durabright, can I polish them?
What sand paper grits do you use when sanding?
Do you wet sand or dry sand?
When I polish it leaves lines or buffer marks, brown zebra lines


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